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Edmond Butler

1936 - 2004

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"Ed" Butler will be remembered and missed as a loving father, caring husband, devoted son, loyal friend, and dedicated physician. Born in San Francisco, he spent his early youth exploring "The City" by streetcar. He then served as student body president at Oakland High School, playing drums and instigating adventures that became family legends. He attended Stanford University as an undergraduate, medical student, and then resident in urology. He was appointed to the faculty at Stanford Medical School, and remained involved with the University during his years in private urology practice at the Menlo Medical Clinic. 

Ed was an enthusiastic and tireless supporter of his family and the community. He was an AYSO soccer coach and commissioner, high school jazz band manager, school play set builder, world traveler, model train collector, gifted photographer, loyal Stanford fan, and lover of the "Big Game" rivalry. He was an extraordinary organizer and tradition creator who loved bringing people together. We will always remember his big smile and unfailing optimism. 

Ed is survived by many loving family members, including seven grandchildren.

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George Dueker

1935 - 2011

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BELLEVUE, WA - Dr. George E. Dueker passed away on December 4, 2011 after being diagnosed with a terminal illness. George was a compassionate soul who brought his caring and healing hands to his family and patients.
George and Sandra were married in Springfield, Missouri in 1959 and had three children: Ken in 1961, Stephen in 1962, and Sharon in 1970. He has one grandson, Cole.

Dr. Dueker received his undergraduate degree in 1957 from Washington University in Saint Louis, Missouri, graduating Cum Laude and inducted into the Phi Beta Kappa Honorary Society. Subsequently he earned a Doctor of Medicine from Washington University in 1961. He then completed his internship and a year of Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Washington in Seattle. Upon completion in 1962, he entered a Urology Residency at the Stanford Medical Center which he completed in 1966. He served on the Stanford faculty for two years prior to setting up a private practice in Adult and Pediatric Urology in Monterey, California.

After a rewarding 25-year practice, he moved to the Seattle area, and continued on as a physician with several Health Care Organizations. He retired in 2006, living with his wife, Sandra in Bellevue.

After retirement, he enjoyed gardening and fishing and was an avid Portland Trailblazer basketball fan. He was a life-long learner. He enjoyed following subjects from physics to cosmology and was an engaging conversationalist.

He is survived by his wife, Sandra; three children, Ken,Stephen and Sharon; sister Mary Chura; brother John Dueker; local in-laws; nephew, David; and his son-in-law, Robert. He will be missed by all.

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William Fair

1936 - 2002

Dr. William R. Fair, professor emeritus of urology, died on Jan. 3 in Sarasota, Fla., from complications with colon cancer. He was 66. 

Dr. Fair, who was member emeritus at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, was also the former Florence and Theodore Baumritter/Enid Ancell Chair of urology, chief of the urology service, and director of the Bendheim Prostate Diagnostic Center at MSKCC. He served as chair of urology at MSKCC for 13 years (1984–1997), and continued to work there until 2000. 

Dr. Fair was an expert on prostate cancer and other urologic tumors. He remained active until a few weeks before his death, including his attendance at a meeting with the White House Commission on Complementary and Alternative Medicine Policy, a group to which he belonged. Dr. Fair was the editor-in-chief of Molecular Urology; the associate editor of Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine; and on the editorial boards of other well-known journals. He also chaired the Committee on Complementary and Alternative Medicine of the American Urologic Association. 

Dr. Fair developed new surgical techniques, treatments and diagnostic tests for prostate cancer. He also published extensively in the areas of urology and oncology. Dr. Fair received his B.S. from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science and his M.D. from Jefferson Medical College. 

Dr. Fair, who lived in Longboat Key, Fla., and Amagansett, N.Y., is survived by his wife, Mary Ann, and his son, William R. Fair III.

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Duncan Govan

1923 - 2007

Duncan Govan, MD, PhD, professor emeritus of urology, died September 28, 2007 at the age of 84 after a prolonged illness. Shortly before his death, he had entered the health center at the Sequoias in Portola Valley. Govan, one of the original faculty of Stanford's School of Medicine when it moved from San Francisco to Palo Alto, served two stints as acting cheif of staff at Stanford Hospital and was known as a great humanitarian, educator and advocate for students and junior clinicans.

Govan was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Caanada in 1923. He earned his MD from the Universitsy of Manitoba in 1948 and spent three yeras there in a general surgery residency, followed by a year in gynecology. In 1954, he moved to the University of Chicago for a urology residency. While there, he obtained his PhD in renal physiology in 1956. In 1958, he moved to Vancouver, British Columbia, where he worked with a urology group for three years. He was awarded a National Research Council grant, allowing him to return to research, until he came to Stanford.

In 1959, when the medical school moved to Palo Alto, a few physicians made the move, so entire clinical departments were staffed from scratch. In 1961, Govan was invited to join the new chief of the division, Thomas Stamey, MD as a professor of urology. Although Govan was a general urologist, his main expertise was in pediatric urology. Many of his investigations were in the field of neurophysiology of the bladder and the upper urinary tract. 

In addition to his clinical work and research, Govan instituted several teaching and education programs. He began seminars to keep local urologists up to date on research . As chair of the medical school's curriculum committee from 1977-1980, Govan co-developed a research program to encourage medical students to enter the field of biological research with guidance of a faculty mentor. 

In 1988, Govan moved to emeritus status. He saw patients until 1993, and came back to duty as deputy chief of staff of Stanford Hospital from 1989 through 1993. He served as acting chief of staff in 1992, and again in 1995-1996. In 1992, he founded a RotaCare free medical clinic in East Palo Alto, begun with $8,000 in donations from local Rotary Clubs and supplies from Stanford Hospital. He was medical director for 10 years.

Govan is survived by his wife, Eileen Patricia, of Portola Valley, six children and many grandchildren.   

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Duncan Govan, 84, professor emeritus of urology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, died Sept. 28 after a prolonged illness.

He was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba. He was awarded his medical degree from the University of Manitoba in 1948 and spent three years there in a general surgery residency, followed by a year in gynecology.

He moved to the University of Chicago for a residency in urology in 1954. He also worked in Vancouver, British Columbia, with a physician's group before being invited to work at Stanford in 1961.

He was one of the original faculty of Stanford's medical school after it moved from San Francisco to Palo Alto in 1959. He served twice as acting chief of staff at Stanford Hospital.

He became professor emeritus in 1988 but continued to see patients until 1993. He served as deputy chief of staff at the hospital from 1989 through 1992 and served as acting chief of staff in 1992 and again in 1995-96.

He is survived by his wife, Eileen Patricia Govan of Portola Valley; six children; and many grandchildren.

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Michael Higgins

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Thomas Love

1938 - 2016

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Age 78 Surrounded by love, he peacefully passed away on February 25 2016, from complications of Alzheimer's disease. Preceded in death by parents, Marg and Jim; brother Richard. Survived by wife, Katie; children, Lisa (Pete Limon) Love, Kip (Kim) Love, James D. Love, Cynthia (Eric) Helm, and Zach Love; first wife, Judy Love: grandchildren, Barrett and Bridgett McSweeney, Kaedyn Limon, Tom and Nick Love, Riley and Cooper Helm, Kyllie, Miya, David and Louie Love; great-grandchildren, Lily Jo and Brogan; sister Jil, Uncle John and many loving in-laws, nieces and nephews.

Tom was born in Dauphin, Manitoba, Canada, graduated Colorado College, University of Colorado Medical School, interned at UCSF Medical Center and did residency in urology at Stanford University. He served as Lieutenant Commander in 
US Navy at Naval Hospital, Boston, Chelsea, Massachusetts 1970-1972, practiced urologic surgery in St.Paul for 25 years, and retired as Medical Director of Surgery at United Hospital in 2006.

Tom loved and cherished his family and friends. He also loved his work, hockey, golfing, hunting and fishing, skiing, planting trees and his Canadian heritage.

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John McNeal

1930 - 2005

John E. McNeal, who pioneered the classification and documentation of prostate cancer, died Nov. 3, 2005, after a 16-year battle with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. He was 75.

During his 22 years at Stanford, McNeal examined and cataloged more than 1,000 cancerous prostates removed by urologists. He took slices of the tissue and studied each under a microscope. He then sketched the cancerous areas and other pathologic features on paper for future reference.

A number of staff urologists took advantage of McNeal's meticulous records. Professor of urology Thomas Stamey, MD, used them to track whether there was any correlation between the amounts of prostate cancer seen and the PSA test, a widely used blood test used to diagnose prostate cancer. In 2004, Stamey and his colleagues published findings that the test is no longer predictive, touting the end of the "PSA era."

McNeal's recognition and description of the three anatomical zones of the prostate changed the way physicians worldwide view the prostate gland. He once remarked that the prostate, both malignant and normal, had "a tremendous variety of architectural forms, in contrast to other organs which are rather dull, with everything looking the same."

McNeal graduated from George Washington University School of Medicine in 1957 and was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society that same year. He completed his residency in pathology at UC-San Francisco in 1962.

Following residency, McNeal pursued a career in private practice in the East Bay. His writings on the structure of the prostate gland gained him recognition in the academic community. In 1983, Stamey convinced him to join the faculty, where he was a clinical professor and senior research associate in the Department of Urology until 2005. For many years, despite being debilitated by chronic illness, he continued to make important observations on the prostate.

McNeal's landmark contributions to the understanding of prostate anatomy and prostate cancer pathology gained him the 1992 Prostate Cancer Award of the American Urological Association. He was author of 129 articles, including "Zonal anatomy of the prostate," in which he defined the structure of the prostate as it is still known today.

McNeal is survived by his wife, Barbara, and three step-daughters: Claudia Franceschi, Mary Redwine and Elise Redwine Wells, who assisted him in his work from 1984 through 1992.

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Edwin Meares Jr

1934 - 2000

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Edwin M. Meares Jr., M.D., 65, a resident since 1991 of Kennebunk, Maine, a U.S. Navy veteran, and chairman of the Urology Department at Tufts/New England Medical Center from 1975 until his retirement in 1996, died at his residence on Sunday, October 22, 2000, following a long illness.
 

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John Sands Jr

1939 - 2010

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Dr. John Porter Sands, Jr. (Captain U.S. Navy Ret.) passed away peacefully at home with his family on October 2, 2010.

John was born on July 20, 1939 to John and Marie Sands of Glendale, Arizona, and raised on his family farm. John attended Arizona State University, and the University of Colorado School of Medicine. He completed his internship at University Hospital in San Diego and his residency in Urology at Stanford University Medical Center. John entered the U.S. Navy in 1972, serving at the Naval Medical Center, San Diego as the Chairman of the Urology Department, the Specialty Advisor for Urology to the Surgeon General, and Director of Surgical Services, while maintaining an active clinical and teaching practice in the Urology Department.

 
 John retired from the U.S. Navy in December 2000. During his career, he was awarded the National Defense Service Medal with star, the Humanitarian Medal, the Navy Unit Commendation Medal with star, and the Meritorious Service Medal. 
 
In the last decade of his life, John devoted himself to his varied and wide reaching interests, including: mentoring at-risk high school students; managing his family's investment company; serving on the Board of Trustees for Scripps College; restoring classic cars and building hotrods; participating in the Downtown Rotary Club of San Diego; and establishing the Starfish Foundation, a non profit organization which seeks to better the lives of the residents in the area of Maseno in western Kenya through their farming practices, women's literacy, and scientific studies. John was a gifted teacher and artist known to his family and friends for his sense of humor as well as his tremendous intellectual curiosity. We wish him fair winds and following seas. 
 
John lives in the loving memory of his wife of 42 years, Carol; his daughter, Adrienne, and her husband, Jesse Finlayson; his daughter, Johanna, and her husband, Scott Brickman; his grandchildren, Madeline, Ashley, Sylvie and Ruben; and his brothers, Edgar, David and Charles, as well as a large extended family.

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From DAVID ROSEN on May 9th, 2017
I remember John as my friend,co-resident,and wine mentor. We shared a warm ,too brief, time together. Fortunately I have the wonderful memory of his hearty laugh and smile. I will miss him at this meeting. 
 

Thomas Stamey

1928 - 2015

Thomas A. Stamey, MD, professor emeritus of urology and noted leader in the study and treatment of prostate cancer died of Alzheimer’s disease September 4, 2015 at his home in Portola Valley, California. He was 87. At Stanford, Stamey helped lay the groundwork for the now-controversial PSA blood test for prostate cancer and helped transform urology and surgery from purely clinical fields to research fields. He made major contributions to four areas of medicine: renal hypertension, urinary tract infections, urinary incontinence and prostate cancer. In 1989, he became the first urologist ever elected to the Institute of Medicine. He was also named an honorary fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh.

Born in North Carolina in 1928, Stamey graduated from Vanderbilt University and went on to earn a medical degree in 1952 from Johns Hopkins University, where he also did his internship and a residency. After serving as a urological consultant for the U.S. Army in the United Kingdom, he joined the faculty of Johns Hopkins in 1958. In 1961, he came west to Stanford’s medical school as associate professor of surgery and chair of the Division of Urology. In 1990, he was appointed founding chair of the newly created Department of Urology and worked to develop it into one of the top programs in the nation. His most spectacular achievement at Stanford was making research for surgeons an important part of an academic career, which was not true of departments in many other parts of the country. Stamey authored or co-authored more than 225 scientific papers, four books, 30 textbook chapters and seven monographs. Among many other awards, he received the Hugh Hampton Young Award (1972) and the Ramon Guiteras Award (1995) from the American Urological Association and the Valentine Award (1991) from the New York Academy of Medicine.

Stamey was also one of the first to show the value of the PSA test for prostate cancer, but then, ironically, his was also a voluble voice against the test’s use to justify unnecessary prostate surgery. In the late 1980s, he pioneered the development of the prostate specific antigen, or PSA, blood test for prostate, which allowed physicians to estimate the risk that a male patient had prostate cancer. As Stamey said at the time, “Our job now is to stop removing every man’s prostate who has prostate cancer. We originally thought we were doing the right thing, but we are now figuring out how we went wrong. Some men need prostate treatment but certainly not all of them.” The 2004 paper was one the last papers he wrote. PSA levels correspond to the size of the prostate. As men age, it’s common for the prostate to become larger, leading to higher levels of PSA in the blood. When surgeons biopsied the prostates of men with high PSA levels, they frequently found cancer. However, what was not obvious at the time was that both an enlarged prostate and small prostate cancers are common among all men and usually not lethal. That is, most men with a prostate cancer will die of something else, and treating the prostate cancer can needlessly lead to a much-reduced quality of life. To Stamey’s credit, he recognized this, and in 2004 published a study showing that the PSA test predicted the size of the patient’s prostate, but not the severity of cancer.

In addition to his work at Stanford, he loved fly-fishing, music and travel.

Stamey is survived by his wife Kathryn and his five children - Frederick Stamey, Charline Stamey, Alex Stamey, Theron Cooper and Allison Stamey — and grandchildren Suzi Quist, George Quist, Heather Magrin, Robin Magrin and Alexis Stamey.

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Professor Emeritus of Urology at Stanford University School of Medicine and a noted leader in the study and treatment of prostate cancer, died Friday, September 4, 2015, at his home in Portola Valley, CA. He was 87. At Stanford, Stamey developed the PSA blood test for prostate cancer and helped transform urology and surgery from purely clinical fields to research fields. In 1989 he became the first urologist ever elected to the Institute of Medicine. He was also named an honorary fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh. "He was truly one of the giants in academic urology, with his biggest impact in prostate cancer. His research formed the basis of much of what we know about prostate cancer today. He trained over 100 residents and fellows, many of whom went on to be leaders in urology in their own right. His permanent influence in the field is assured", stated Eila Skinner, MD, professor and chair of Urology at Stanford. Born in North Carolina in 1928, he worked with his parents in their general store as a young boy, going on to attend Virgina Military Institute for two years then graduating from Vanderbilt University. Medical training was at Johns Hopkins University where he earned his MD, did his internship and urology residency. He served on the faculty there from 1958 to 196l, (after serving two years as Urological Consultant for the United States Air Force in the United Kingdom). In 196l he was recruited to Stanford University School of Medicine to serve as Chairman of Urology, a position he held for 33 years. One of his great achievements there was to make one year of research in the laboratory a requirement of the resident's training, which was almost unique compared to many other parts of the country. "People talk about translational medicine now, but we were doing it back then. That research focus was the reason", stated Linda Shortliffe, MD, a resident from 1977 to 1981. Stamey authored or co- authored more than 225 scientific papers, four books, 30 textbook chapters and seven monographs. Among many other awards, he received the Hugh Hampton Young award and the Ramon Guiteras Award from the American Urological Association and the Valentine Award from the New York Academy of Medicine. He was a resident scholar at the Rockefeller Foundation Study and Conference Center in Bellagio, Italy, and had a sabbatical year at Oxford University, England. Many former residents, when hearing of Dr. Stamey's death commented on their memories of their training, and of still hearing his soft, but authoritative, North Carolina accented voice (not very common in the West) even today while working in the operating room, or sometimes in their sleep. Dr. Stamey was devoted to his family and is survived by his wife Kathryn, and children Frederick, Charline (Douty), Alex, Theron (Cooper) and Allison.

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